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Christmas Ornament Ideas

Six HGTV.com users share their crafty ideas and tips for creating handmade Christmas ornaments.

Created by Dawn Squire
Wahiawa, Hawaii


Dawn lives in Hawaii, where sadly there are no snowmen around the holidays. So she decided to create her own, complete with island flair and Aloha style. To create this project, you'll need basic stained glass materials and tools.


1. Dawn recommends that you begin your project by sketching your pattern, then cutting it out and placing it on glass.


2. Cut glass with scoring tool, next grind the glass' edges to your desired shape.


3. Wrap glass with copper foil and solder the edges with 60/40 lead solder.


4. Clean your finished piece before adding the glass paint.


5. Following manufacturer's directions, bake paint for permanence.


6. Add ribbon or raffia for hanging your ornament.

Created by Rani Shah
Los Osos, Calif.


Materials and Tools:


gold beading wire
card stock
X-Acto knife
scissors
large glass gems
various inspirational words printed from your computer
photographs or flat embellishements, like paper flowers
e6000 adhesive
green latex craft paint
craft brushes
spray-on paper protector


Steps:


1. If you aren't starting with pre-made card stock blossoms, the first step is to sketch your design onto card stock or chipboard and cut out using an X-Acto blade or scissors.


2. Paint blossom front, back and edges with latex craft paint.

3. Type assorted inspirational and holiday-themed words on your computer, changing font colors and styles on each one. These will go under the glass gems, so size your words accordingly. Print them out.


4. Spray printed sheet with paper protector and allow to thoroughly dry.


5. Cut out printed words and glue them to the center of card stock blossoms along with other flat paper embellishments, like flowers, snowflakes, stars, etc.

6. Attach glass gem to center of card stock blossom using a small amount e6000 glue. Press firmly to eliminate any bubbles.

7. Wrap each individual petal with gold beading wire. Wrap around the entire blossom and leave enough to create a hook on the back of one petal.


8. Attach wire ornament hook or ribbon and use to decorate the tree, mantel or chandelier.

Created by Penny A. Talley
Colorado Springs, Colo.


Penny makes her Light Bulb Ornaments from burned-out light bulbs, basic craft supplies (such as: craft paint, ribbon and fabric) and a bit of imagination. She recommends that you begin by cleaning the light bulb with rubbing alcohol to aid the craft paint's adhesion. Next paint the design onto the light bulb. To ensure an opaque finish, several coats of paint may be necessary. Use card stock or oven-bake clay to create the feet, nose and fins. Make the stocking cap from a bit of knit fabric, such as a brightly colored old sock or t-shirt. Finish your ornament by hot-gluing a string of mini Christmas lights or tiny presents to the penguin's fins and adding a ribbon for hanging. A great holiday craft project for kids of all ages, these whimsical ornaments would make inexpensive, earth-friendly gifts for neighbors or teachers.

Created by Kim McDougall
Orefield, Pa.


Kim is an avid crafter who dabbles in many different arts. But she says that her favorite is needle felting. To create her ornaments, she purchases raw fleece from sheep farmers, which she then cleans and dyes into suitable colors for her projects. Next, she decides on a design and begins shaping her creation using a 3-prong needle. By repeatedly compressing the wool with the needle she is able to shape it into the form she wants. She further refines this form by using a single needle. Once Kim has created the basic shape, she attaches the arms, legs and any accessories (hats, scarves) using only one needle. Kim says that the process of needle felting a small figure can take two to eight hours, depending on the size and complexity of the project. Finally, she glues on any non-felt details, such as the eyes, antlers, etc.

Created by Beverley Edens
Melbourne, Fla.


To make her Santa People ornaments, Beverley begins by sketching a human-shaped pattern. She traces this onto five-inch squares of 1/8-inch pine. Using a jigsaw, she cuts out the shapes and paints the entire front of the form flesh tone; the back of the form gets a coat of black paint. If you're giving these as a gift, a great idea is to write a short holiday message and the year on the back of each ornament with a metallic paint pen. If it will be a Santa ornament, she paints on red pants and black shoes. On Mrs. Claus ornaments, she paints on white socks, black shoes and modest undies. Next she cuts out the faces of friends and family from photos. If you don't want to destroy treasured photos, use color copies or images printed from your computer. Beverley attaches the photographed face to the doll with Mod Podge. To create the Claus' clothing, she cuts the jacket and dress shapes from red felt which she glues on with craft glue. Finally, she adds the embellishments. Mrs. Claus gets white fur around the sleeve and dress hems, a seed pearl necklace and sequins with a seed pearl center for buttons. Santa gets white fur trim on his jacket and collar and small black buttons. Beverley adds a small screw eye for hanging on the tree with ribbon.

Created by Micheline Nunez
College Point, N.Y.


Micheline made this ornament with a 2-inch x 5-inch papier mache box lid as the frame. She began by painting the lid on both sides with copper paint. Once both sides were completely dry, she painted the center of the lid with gel medium; before this could dry she poured copper colored micro beads onto the medium. To create an altar for her vintage angel image, Micheline embossed card stock with an altar stamp. Next, she highlighted the image with a sponge dipped in walnut crystal spray. She then attached her vintage image using foam tape to create a 3-D effect. The internet or antique stores are great resources for finding beautiful, vintage greeting card images. Finally, Micheline beaded a few glass beads onto copper wire and fed this through a hole she punched in the top of the lid for hanging.

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