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Shoebox: Christmas Crafts

Check out these fun Christmas craft ideas sent in by viewers.

It was another "Happy Christmas" Shoebox that we had on the show today, filled with more fun ideas that you had sent in at Christmas time when we didn't have enough shows to feature them. Today was the day.

To begin, we trimmed our miniature tree with some of the delightful polymer clay ornaments that Penny Russell of Port St Lucie, Fla., sent in. Penny had seen the Holiday Workshop show in which Becky Meverden had featured a little polymer clay snowman sitting on top of an ornament selling snow balls (tiny white pom-poms) and thought it was so adorable that she had to try her hand at making some of the snowmen. She ended up having them everywhere doing everything. One was clutching a small candy cane, another sitting on a pine cone, a third holding a strand of miniature Christmas lights, etc. They were delightful. Penny wrote, "Here it is late June and I'm wrapping Christmas presents...snowmen for everyone!" Penny's snowmen looked almost exactly like Becky's. She would have been proud.

Another viewer who was inspired by Becky's snowmen was Doris Nikolai of San Diego, Calif. Doris said that she had never worked with polymer clay before, but once she started making the snowmen, she didn't want to stop. Though Doris started out by making the snowmen ornaments, she then made a few elf ornaments and then mouse ornaments until she had enough for everyone at their family Christmas dinner. She made stands from cut paper towel tubes, printed the names on the tubes, and placed an ornament on the top. Doris took a photograph of her many ornaments/place card/table favors and printed it out on a large sheet of paper; then she folded it into the "Just a little hello" folds that Michael Strong had demonstrated on the show.

Some of you will remember the Holiday Workshop show on which I inserted a photograph of my grandson into a clear glass ornament so that it appeared to be floating inside. That started many variations over the years, but none like the one sent in by Peggy Silvester of Jacksonville, N.C. Instead of a photograph, Peggy painted a picture on an acetate circle and inserted it into the ornament then painted a background scene on the outside of half of the ornament. The one Peggy sent to us featured a sail boat sailing on the water inside the clear glass ornament and some beach, more water and a lighthouse painted on the outside.

Peggy said that after she started painting them...scenes with lighthouses, dolphins, pelicans and sailboats as well as nature scenes, etc., she started selling them. She also made one for a friend of her new home. The house was on the acetate and on the outside of the ball she showed the trees and shrubs in her backyard. Peggy's work can be purchased at the Carteret County History museum, THE HISTORY PLACE in Morehead City, N.C. She also mentioned that she uses air-dry Perm Enamel by Delta should you care to give it a try.

But that wasn't all... Also in the Shoebox was an ornament from Patricia Leigaber of Bradley S.C. Patty has a small craft business called Patty May's Creations, and her contribution to the Shoebox was a very cute little snowman that Patty had created by painting a small gourd.

And Patty's gourd wasn't the only one. Jewell Nagel of Valley Center, Calif., also paints gourds. The two that she sent to the Shoebox were cut out so that one was a little bird's nest for a very cute little artificial bird and the other was a miniature bird feeder. Jewell had painted each gourd with very pretty designs.

Then, very different from any of the others, were two ornaments from Barbara Sanchez of Menafee, Calif. Barbara's ornaments were made with microscope slides that held photographs back to back inside of two slides held together with metallic tape and wrapped with a bit of colored wire onto which a few small beads had been strung. The second ornament that Barbara sent contained a photo that had been printed on acetate so that the light could shine through. Both were very pretty.

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