5 Most Popular Kitchen Layouts

Learn how a kitchen's shape affects its functionality, the pros and cons of each and which layout is right for you.

vaulted ceilings highlight kitchen

Essential Work Triangle

The three points of the frequently mentioned work triangle are the range, sink and refrigerator. Appliances can be broken up with the classic shapes; for example, the cooktop and wall ovens might be in different areas. Two sinks are important for a two-cook kitchen. Design by Gail Drury.

traditional kitchen features modern upgrades

Zone Design

To really break up the different areas of the kitchen, consider a zone design. In this kitchen, a separate work station exists for cooking, eating and even cleaning, allowing space for several helpers all at once.

Modern Kitchen

Galley or Corridor-Style

The galley, or corridor, kitchen has two straight runs on either side. Typically the sink is on one side and the range is on the other. The drawback to this design is traffic flow. A simple, one-wall design can be transformed into a galley shape with the addition of an island opposite the wall of cabinets. Islands help replace needed storage that is lost in an open kitchen design with limited wall cabinets.

Cork Kitchen Floor With White Cabinets

L-Shaped Layout

For more privacy when cooking, choose an L-shaped layout which forces the traffic out of the work area. For more interaction with family and guests, try an L-shape with an island. The L-shaped kitchen has a main wall of cabinets with either the sink or range and a shorter run of cabinets placed in an L-configuration.

Sandcastles-New-Kitchen-U-shaped-2

U-Shaped Layout

The U-shape evolved as storage needs increased. It provides a massive expanse of counter and storage space as well as great flexibility. The G-shape is the basic U with another little leg. It is great for a one-cook kitchen and allows the work area to be spread out. Design by Rate My Space user SANDCASTLES.

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