Trends in Backyard Design: What's Hot Now

Update your patio, deck or backyard with what's new in outdoor design.

  • Flowering Plants near Stone Walkway

    Mainstream Sustainability

    Low-maintenance gardens, drought-tolerant plants and less turfgrass have become the norm in landscape design. Homeowners now assume sustainable design will be a major part of the plan — both for economic and environmental reasons. In this California design by Barbara Paul, plants were chosen not only for their gorgeous cottage-garden beauty but also for their tolerance of dry summers and wet winters.

  • Geometric Vegetable Garden

    Edibles, Front and Center

    Blended gardens that incorporate edibles and ornamentals do double duty, giving gardeners a bountiful harvest of fruit, vegetables and herbs and an alternative to turfgrass. Edible gardens also create community as urban farmers share their bounty around the neighborhood.

  • Arbor Grill

    Better Quality, Less Bling

    Post-recession: Over-the-top, showy landscapes are out. Now, homeowners prefer to invest in quality and natural materials. Here, scale is key to a good design, says landscape architect Kerry Burt. The eight-foot cedar posts add heft to this arbor.

  • Water Feature

    Like a Fish to Water

    We love the sound of water in the garden: water features from inexpensive self-contained systems in an urn or portable fountain to a high-end water wall are popular across all budgets. Water feature designed by landscape architect Chad Robert

  • traditional outdoor living room

    Indoors Ventures Outside

    Thanks to new outdoor fabrics, which are made from acrylic fibers and are fade-resistant and waterproof, homeowners can create permanent living spaces outdoors with comfortable fabrics and furniture. Space designed by Scott Cohen

  • Backyard Chicken Coop and Pond

    The Birds and the Bees

    It's back-to-the-earth functionality in more and more backyards. Besides figuring out how to incorporate veggie gardens and fruit trees into the landscape, some homeowners are also adding chickens and bees.

  • Going Green

    One of the ecofriendly elements of the HGTV Green Home 2012 is the barbecue courtyard. Born of architect Steve Kemp's vision for a truly green design, the outdoor space replaces the conventional backyard, which would have required major regrading of the site and the construction of retaining walls. \"Now the 'yard' is open to almost every room in the house, rather than being open to one or two rooms,\" he says.

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