HGTV Green Home 2012: Kitchen Pictures

Warm and welcoming, the kitchen boasts stellar views and space to cook and congregate.

Hickory wood cabinetry, custom-designed in Atlanta, Ga., establishes the room's subdued neutral palette.

Variation in tile — both travertine and glass — lends interest in the space, where sliver windows, capped with extension-arm lamps, provide ample task lighting. Outlets are concealed atop each tiled window ledge.

Floating display shelves showcase earth-toned pottery. A collection of wood and metal vessels draws the eye, while Serenbe custom jams add the needed pop of color.

Frameless cabinetry complete with full overlay doors is paired with stainless steel, satin nickel and galvanized metal to tell a story of warm and cool surfaces.

A dual-fuel range offers a pro-style cooktop, genuine European convection™ with an advanced circulation system, up to 10 cooking modes and 4.6 cubic feet of capacity.

A tiled kitchen backsplash inset provides space to display cooking supplies. Oils and vinegars, sourced at a Roswell, Ga., community market, tell a story of sustainability.

In the island front, double doors open to reveal 23-inch-deep by 40-inch-wide storage cabinets. To encourage dining at the table or in the courtyard, interior designer Linda Woodrum eliminated barstools.

Sandblasted glass panels provide contrast while concealing items stored behind garage-style cabinet doors.

Sleek and energy efficient, the stainless steel side-by-side refrigerator boasts a multi-airflow cooling system that ensures an even temperature distribution.

Strategically placed glass walls create the illusion of expansive square footage, with one room bleeding effortlessly into the next.

Architectural outswing folding patio doors open to the home's barbecue courtyard, a second dining area. Doors may remain open to foster conversation between the hostess and guests.

The kitchen and the barbecue courtyard share contained garden beds, planted with low-maintenance evergreen mondo grass and camellia japonica, which blooms four to five months out of the year.

\"The accordion door in the kitchen not only blurs the line between inside and out but actually removes the exterior wall entirely,\" says architect Steve Kemp. \"Everyone always ends up in the kitchen (you can't prevent it), so we decided to extend the kitchen outside into the courtyard and make it a true center of the home. The glass corner walls visually make the courtyard feel like another room in the home.\"

A hallway connects the kitchen and other social spaces to the retreat room, a space designed for quiet reflection.

A tall handblown glass canister holds a bouquet of snowball flowers. A stoneware planter presents a plate of beets, interior designer Linda Woodrum's nod to Serenbe Farms.

Cabinetry extends 10 feet to the kitchen ceiling. A small pantry area, carved between two columns of cabinetry, looks out onto the staircase.

Glass and stone tile, warm wood surfaces, stainless steel and shimmering metals are among the textures and materials layered to create visual interest.

Tumbled travertine and glass mosaic tile is used to define inset wall surfaces that surround sliver windows. Windows provide natural light while ensuring privacy.

An undercounter stainless steel farmhouse sink benefits from a classically styled pulldown faucet in a spot-resistant stainless steel. The flow-optimized faucet promises up to 32 percent savings in water usage.

Custom terrazzo-blend countertop material clads three sides of the island. The material, a proprietary mix of cement binder, pozzolans, sand, fiber and decorative aggregates, including bottle glass reclaimed from Atlanta restaurants and neighborhood recycling programs, lends drama to the space.

The flooring material and ceiling design differentiates the kitchen from the dining and living rooms. \"You are certainly going to feel like you are in one room or another room, but there are no walls separating spaces,\" says HGTV Green Home 2012 design and construction expert Curtis Peart.

Countertop accessories tell their own greens stories. A set of ceramic vintage-style ruled pitchers rests atop a Bavarian bread board, fashioned from 19th-century reclaimed wood.

The kitchen transitions seamlessly to the dining area, where colors and textures — and height of accessories — are held down to keep all eyes focused on the view.

Advertisement will not be printed