Potager Herb Garden

Groups of symmetrically arranged raised beds provide an easy and attractive way to cultivate a wide range of herbs without having to set foot on the soil. Learn how to grow your own potager herb garden.

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A Garden Within a Garden DK - Simple Steps to Success: Herbs © 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Groups of symmetrically arranged raised beds provide an easy and attractive way to cultivate a wide range of herbs without having to set foot on the soil. Keeping the beds small enough so that every part can be reached from the path means that "zero dig" cultivation methods can be tried out as well as allowing for highly intensive mono-cropping of each small section. Different types of mint can be grown for its varying flavors while lovers of chives (Allium) will make small work of a single clump. The paths between the wicker-framed raised beds have been kept narrow to maximize growing space and allow easy access. For drama, plant cardoons (Cynara cardunculus) and for perfume, add lavender.

Materials Needed:

  • 3 x Cynara cardunculus
  • 1 x packet seed Allium schoenoprasum
  • 5 x Lavandula angustifolia "Hidcote"
  • 1 x packet seed Coriandrum sativum
  • 5 x Mentha pulegium

Border Basics

Size: 10x10 feet
Suits: Any type of garden
Soil: Good quality multi-purpose or soil-based compost
Site: Sheltered site in full sun

Planting and Aftercare

Sow tender herbs directly into fresh soil outdoors in summer, but for earlier crops, they are best sown in modules indoors from early spring and planted out once frosts have passed. Spaces between permanent perennial or herbs can be in-filled with more sowings of seed sown directly. Toward the end of summer or when light fades, compost any remaining tender herbs, replacing them with parsley and lamb's lettuce sown directly into the soil.

Cynara cardunculus (image 1)
Fully hardy plants, Well-drained soil, Full sun, Award-winning plant.

Allium schoenoprasum (image 2)
Fully hardy plants, Well-drained soil, Full sun.

Lavandula angustifolia "Hidcote" (image 3)
Fully hardy plants, Well-drained soil, Moist soil, Full sun, Award-winning plant.

Coriandrum sativum (image 4)
Fully hardy plants, Well-drained soil, Full sun.

Mentha pulegium (image 5)
Fully hardy plants, Well-drained soil, Moist soil, Full sun.

Excerpted from Simple Steps: Herbs

©Dorling Kindersley Limited 2009

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