Pest-Prone Plants

When you're shopping for new plants, save yourself some heartache down the road and look for tolerance to disease and insects.

Font
  • A
  • A
  • A

E-mail This Page to Your Friends

x

All fields are required.

Separate multiple e-mail addresses with a comma; Maximum 20 email addresses.

Refresh

Sending E-mail

Sending E-mail

Or Do Not E-mail

Success!

A link to %this page% was e-mailed

A devastating fungal disease — the leaf spot Entomosporium maculatum — has completely defoliated many Fraser photinias (often referred to as redtips). The Chinese form, Photinia serrulata, is resistant to that leaf spot but is susceptible to a number of other diseases.

Garden phlox is a staple of many perennial gardens, but in warm, humid climates, it's highly susceptible to mildew. The flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) is prey to a wide range of insects and diseases, including borers and anthracnose. The European white birch is susceptible to the bronze birch borer.

Lilacs, garden phlox, roses, crabapples, birch and dogwoods — beloved plants sometimes host a lot of problems. In many of our favorite plant families, some members are especially insect- and disease-prone. The good news, though, is that others are not.

For garden phlox, the resistant cultivars include 'David', 'Delta Snow', Natascha', 'Robert Poore', 'Speed Limit 45' and Phlox caroliniana. Certain dogwood cultivars like 'Cherokee Princess' and 'Pluribracteata' (the double-flowered form) that show excellent resistance to anthracnose; and there's always the Kousa dogwood (Cornus kousa), which resists most of the things that plague C. florida. White-barked birches are generally susceptible to borer, particularly if they encounter stress. The much touted Betula platyphylla 'Whitespire' birch is resistant, but only if the tree has been vegetatively propagated from the original resistant strain and not grown from seed. So you if you don't want to risk tangling with the borer, you could consider the river birch (Betula nigra), which offers multicolored, exfoliating bark.

« Previous12

More From My First Garden

Growing Perennials

Growing Perennials

Growing Perennials

(3 videos)
6 Fast-Growing Spring Veggies

6 Fast-Growing Spring Veggies

Plant these vegetable seeds and you can begin harvesting a month later. HGTV.com experts share tips.

(6 photos)
Controlling Common Garden Pests

Controlling Common Garden Pests

Simple preventive treatments and tips for keeping your garden safe from slugs, snails, aphids, small mammals and other garden...

Advertisement

HGTV Outdoors Newsletter

Find out how to make the most of patios, decks and all your outdoor areas, plus tips from master gardeners for beautiful flower beds and bountiful vegetable gardens.