How to Grow Your Own Berries

Once you sample your homegrown blackberries and raspberries, you'll know they were worth the trouble.

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Training

Once your plants start growing, it's important to differentiate between the old and new growth. During the first year, your plants may grow five to six feet; as it grows, tie it up along the trellis. "In fact, some years what I've done is tied a string down to the vine, and it'll then grow straight up the string to the wire," says Chuck.

With the summer-bearing types, train the flowering canes along the wires and encourage diagonal growth. Then the primal canes should have plenty of room and sunlight to grow vertically between the two wires.

Don't forget to train the new growth regularly or prune your brambles before they have a chance to ramble out of control. Water your berry plants well, add some organic mulch, and soon, tasty treats will be on their way.

These berries take some extra time and work in the garden, but the outstanding fruit will be your delectable reward.

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