Growing Hot Pepper Plants

Peppers are easy to grow and spice up many different foods. Learn how to grow your own pepper plant.

Font
  • A
  • A
  • A

E-mail This Page to Your Friends

x

All fields are required.

Separate multiple e-mail addresses with a comma; Maximum 20 email addresses.

Refresh

Sending E-mail

Sending E-mail

Or Do Not E-mail

Success!

A link to %this page% was e-mailed

Pepper PotsEnlarge Photo+Shrink Photo-DK - Simple Steps to Success: Herbs © 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Even the blandest of foods can be spiced up with the addition of fresh chili pepper. For the quickest results, small fruiting plants can be bought from nurseries or specialist growers, but they are also easy to grow from the wide variety of seeds available. Look for the long, thin "Pinocchio’s Nose," which can reach 12 inches long and turns red when ripe, or the stubbier "Hungarian Hot Wax;" but remember, color and size is no indicator of hotness. Take care when handling the fruits and seeds and wash your hands, as inadvertently rubbing your eyes can be very painful.

Materials Needed:

  • 1 x chili pepper "Golden Cayenne"
  • 1 x chili pepper "Pinocchio’s Nose"
  • 1 x chili pepper "Fillius Blue"
  • 1 x chili pepper "Hungarian Hot Wax"
  • 1 x chili pepper "Prairie Fire"
  • 1 x chili pepper "Cayenne"

Container Basics

Size 8x8 inches pot per plant
Suits Any style of garden
Soil Rich multi-purpose compost
Site Greenhouse, conservatory, or sheltered windowsill in full sun

Planting and Aftercare

Sow seed according to packet at a temperature of 68–77 degrees F in a 50/50 mix of vermiculite and multi-purpose compost. Sow one or two seeds per small pot and lightly cover them with a sprinkling of vermiculite. Keep moist using tepid water and do not over water. Germination can be in 10–14 days, but may take considerably longer. Transplant when the roots have filled the existing container—chilies do like to be tight in their pots. When the flowers begin to form, start feeding the chilies with a liquid fertilizer and keep in a warm spot. Keep over winter for an even better crop in the second year.

Chili pepper "Golden Cayenne" (image 1)
Plants that need protection from frost over winter, Well-drained soil, Full sun.

Chili pepper "Pinocchio’s Nose" (image 2)
Plants that need protection from frost over winter, Well-drained soil, Full sun.

Chili pepper "Fillius Blue" (image 3)
Plants that need protection from frost over winter, Well-drained soil, Full sun.

Chili pepper "Hungarian Hot Wax" (image 1)
Plants that need protection from frost over winter, Well-drained soil, Full sun.

Chili pepper "Prairie Fire" (image 2)
Plants that need protection from frost over winter, Well-drained soil, Full sun.

Chili pepper "Cayenne" (image 3)
Plants that need protection from frost over winter, Well-drained soil, Full sun.

Excerpted from Simple Steps: Herbs

©Dorling Kindersley Limited 2009

We Recommend...

Grow Fruit in a Small Space

Grow Fruit in a Small Space

Even if you have no garden soil in which to plant, you can still grow a fruit tree. Almost all fruit trees on the market are...

Citrus Trees for Indoors

Citrus Trees for Indoors

You don't have to live in the Deep South or California to grow great citrus.

How to Plant Raspberries

How to Plant Raspberries

Vigorous and easy to grow, autumn-fruiting raspberries look after themselves once established and just need regular pruning to...

Advertisement

HGTV Outdoors Newsletter

Find out how to make the most of patios, decks and all your outdoor areas, plus tips from master gardeners for beautiful flower beds and bountiful vegetable gardens.