12 Inspiring Formal Gardens

Replicate the clean lines of the world's most famous gardens in your own yard.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Photo By: Image courtesy of Karl Gercens

Jardin des Tuileries, Paris

Pottery prowess! The Louvre looms large in the background while Grecian urns hold court over summer wildflowers in this Parisian garden. Tip: Add an oversize vessel to your grounds for extra drama. Image courtesy of Karl Gercens.

De Keukenhof, The Netherlands

Stylish swirl: Dutch bulbs do a yin yang dance in this high density, high impact flower garden. Tip: Plant flowers closely together and keep bed edges neatly shaped. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Hidcote Manor Garden, England

Square dance! This Arts and Crafts garden dates from 1905, when greens were tamed, trimmed and kept behind brick walls. Tip: Create walkways between beds and don't forget to consider geometry and symmetry. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Kiftsgate Court Gardens, England

Be modern! A reflecting pool that sprouts sculpture creates an air of austerity and whimsy in the middle of a lush 19th century garden. Tip: With enough breathing room, minimalism can work in any yard. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Schloesser Augustusburg, Germany

Parterres party! Formal designs with miniature boxwoods and pansies flourish in the wide open spaces of this baroque Rhineland garden. Tip: Experiment with boxwood design, then make room to add buds. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Castle Kennedy Gardens, Scotland

Road to ruins! A sharp strip of grass carves a dramatic path to a 17th century castle, lined with purple malvaceae and pink dianthus. Tip: Create beds in parallel lines with turf in between for immediate formal effect. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Alnwick Garden, England

Sword salute! A bamboo labyrinth adds an exotic touch to an otherwise stately contemporary garden in the wilds of Northumberland. Tip: Arbors and tunnels create separate areas and expand the spaciousness of your garden. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Belsay Hall, England

Block party! The razor-sharp edges of trimmed Taxus – when paired with lively lilium – gives this English garden the appearance of a clean, close shave. Tip: Place soft shapes next to straight lines for complementary plant pairings. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Jardins Albert Kahn, France

Rock on! A bridge of field stones circles a gentle waterfall in this terraced French hideaway. Tip: Stepping stones aren't just for dry land. Try them in shallow water features or ponds. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Botanicactus, Mallorca, Spain

Tropical punch! This Spanish garden features nothing but palms, cacti and succulents. Tip: You warm-climate gardeners should try Cycas revoluta (pictured), a jaunty Japanese palm variety. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Alnwick Garden, England

In this pretty English garden, a clever stone-lined runnel triples as a water feature, water run-off collector and irrigation trough. Tip: Strong borders are the key to keeping the runnel clean and free of debris. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Royal National Rose Society, England

Purple haze! This arbor tunnel, lined with lavender and roses, is a lush and dreamy vision. Tip: Maintaining overhead foliage is key to the romance of this look; keep everything trimmed! Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.

Jardin Japones

Checkerboard charm! This Buenos Aires garden intersperses turf tiles with concrete squares to striking effect. Tip: Create this look at home with sod and garden bricks. Be sure to leave enough space to edge the grass for a crisp look. Photo courtesy of Karl Gercens.