DIY Wildlife Indian Corn Wreath

Learn how to make this beautiful treat for your backyard wildlife.

DIY: Wildlife Indian Corn Wreath

DIY: Wildlife Indian Corn Wreath

Critters are sure to enjoy this treat once they discover it's for them!

Photo by: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo by Melissa Caughey

Critters are sure to enjoy this treat once they discover it's for them!

As the weather cools, we seem to see more backyard wildlife in search of food. Squirrels and chipmunks are busily foraging for freshly fallen acorns. The wild birds are also busy getting their fill at the backyard feeders. It's not uncommon in the fall to discover our beautiful pumpkin displays have been enjoyed by those curious critters too. This year, I decided to make a beautiful treat for them, an Indian corn wreath. Each year, our local farm stands fill to the brim with mums, pumpkins, gourds and Indian corn. I picked up two extra bunches just for this wreath.

Indian corn (Zea mays indurata) finds its roots with the Native Americans. Also known, as flint corn, it was one of the first crops that the Native Americans showed the early colonists how to grow. It soon became a staple in the diet of the early colonists, just as it was for the Native American people. Indian corn preserves and dries well. The kernels' color range is lovely, incorporating reds, blues, yellows, whites and oranges. This comes from years of hybridization. The exterior skin on each kernel is said to be "hard as flint" thus its name. Indian corn can be fed to livestock and humans and frequently is used in dishes such as hominy and polenta. It can also be ground for cornmeal and flour or used as popcorn.

When I originally designed this wreath, I wanted to be sure that I could refill the ears of corn on the wreath throughout the season and year after year. At one of the large home improvement stores, I found copper grounding wire on spools that could be cut to length. It was just perfect! Plus copper is also food safe which was another added bonus. Once done, I hung the wreath from an iron hook on our oak tree. This way our resident squirrels can quickly discover it. Here is what you will need to get started on a wreath of your own. 

Supply List:

  • Indian Corn
  • Copper grounding wire—4 feet
  • Pliers
  • Drill

For the full step-by-step tutorial, take a peek at the gallery below and accompanying captions.

Wildlife Wreath How-To

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A Few Ingredients

Just a few simple ingredients yield one lovely fall wreath.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Gather Your Supplies

To make this wreath, you will need: assorted Indian corn / copper grounding wire- 4 feet / drill / pliers 

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Break It

Break each Indian corn in the middle with your hands.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Drill the Center

With the drill, drill a hole large enough for your copper wire through the center of each cob.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Bend It

With the pliers, bend one end of the wire into a loop. This will keep the corn on the wire.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Add the Corn

Slide the corn down the wire until it meets the loop.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Mix It Up

Add corn until you reach the end of the wire. Try mixing up and varying the corn, husks and all, as you place them onto the wire.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Loop the End

After you have filled the wire with the corn, add a hook at the end with the pliers like so.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Connect the Ends

To complete the wreath, place the hook into the loop at the opposite end. Bend the wreath into shape.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Hanging Around

Place the wreath where wildlife can easily see and access it. To replace the corn, simple unhook the wire and repeat the previous steps.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

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