HGTV Dream Home 2010: Kids' Bedroom Pictures

A full-size bed with graphic Chippendale-style headboard gets a modern makeover when paired with a bright orange coverlet and shams, grosgrain ribbon bedding and a polka-dotted lumbar pillow.

Disney·Pixar's Toy Story series served as inspiration for the bedroom design, punctuated by bright colors, interesting patterns and toys galore.

A polka-dotted turquoise pillow complements the vivid wall shade of "reflecting pool" blue. Smocked bedding in a tangerine orange adds a fresh element.

A smocked orange coverlet is used to cover a memo board displayed at the entry to the bedroom. Custom crafted by carpenter David Brown, the board is decorated with Toy Story ephemera and western toys. "I wanted the bulletin board just because I thought it would be fun in a child's room," adds Woodrum.

Western toys and accessories by John R. Craighead Company, Inc. make a connection to the film as well as the home's Southwest location.

The bedpost is decked with a cowboy hat and lasso. A Buzz Lightyear action figure stands at the ready for playtime fun. "Jack got really excited about the cowboy theme," recalls interior designer Linda Woodrum. "He went out and bought the chaps and hat."

A cozy Toy Story throw blanket is placed at the foot of the bed, should chilly evenings require additional cover.

A series of Native American weavings are framed and displayed in their own dedicated wall space adjacent to a light wood storage furnishing.

A tiered dresser provides space for both media and clothing storage. A light "chai" finish complements rather than competes with the bold wall color.

Colorful toys double as wall art in this eclectic kid's bedroom. Purchased at Mariposa Gallery in Albuquerque and crafted by woodworker and stay-at-home dad Isaac AlaridPease, decorative figures make the space pop. "When I saw those six months ago, I thought, 'Oh my gosh, these are the best things in the world for a boy's room'," says Woodrum.

A toy bow and arrow creates a decorative arch over the dresser and connects two collections of Native American weavings.