You Won't Believe What's Inside This San Francisco Loft

How does an unwieldy mobile home become an integral part of a condo? Take a walk through to see.
By: Amy Keyishian

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Photo By: Climb Real Estate

Winnebago Loft Living Room

A home within a home, doors within doors: San Francisco real estate is an enigma, all right.

Upstairs, Downstairs

With only about 1,000 square feet of space, every inch has to count. The loft is a nice addition of floor space, but it's not very private.

Kitchen To Living Room

The mini-mobile home, on the right, acts as a room divider, separating the eating area from the sun-drenched living room.

Indoor Rooftop

Brooklyn hipsters swat mosquitoes and suffer tar stains on their skinny jeans. SoMa hipsters (the ones who end up here, anyway) have a considerably more comfortable option.

Dining Area

The success of this hard-to-sell loft is a testament to "the power of interior design in selling homes," says Lim. 

Front To Back

Loft dwellers would do well to be inspired by the Winnebago innovation: It's a fun, interesting way to increase the usable area in an airy, high-ceilinged space. 

Looking Down

From the bedroom aerie, the many-leveled floor plan has an M.C. Escher feeling. 

Bedroom Level

It's comfortable and roomy, but is this sleeping space private? No. Those who crave quiet time will need another option.

Looking Down Again

There is plenty of open, light-drenched room in the loft, and no shortage of open space.

Full View

Consultants helped shape the space for the ideal buyer with guidance on the art, plants and color palette. 

Outside The Building

Welcome to your new "trailer park."

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