How To: Cutting and Hanging Decorative Molding

Dress up your dining room -- or any room -- with this decorative chair rail and panel molding.

MoldingAfter_1

Materials and Tools:

pneumatic nail gun and nails
measuring tape
contractor's pencil
laser level
circular saw
one gallon paint Stainmaster Barely There
carpenter's glue
DAP liquid adhesive
20 House of Fara oak decorative crowns
12 House of Fara oak IS crown corners
4 House of Fara oak OS crown corners
20 House of Fara oak panels
10 House of Fara embossed battern

MoldingStep-5

Chair Rail

1. Paint the chair rail and the trim.
2. Use level and tape measure to mark the level on the wall where the chair rail will go. Ours was 37-1/2 inches from the floor.
3. Use the circular saw to cut the chair rail to size. When cutting them, make sure the patterns line up.
4. Run a strip of carpenter's glue across the back.
5. Cut wedge for end of chair rail return miter to have pattern running to the wall instead of end grain.

MoldingStep-7

6. Set the chair rail 1/2 inch from the wall to have a bit of green showing.
7. Attach the wedge to the chair rail, and then attach the chair rail to the wall so that it just barely covers the line.
8. Nail the chair rail to the wall with the nail gun at a 45-degree angle. Shooting the nail on an angle pinches it into the drywall and makes it harder for it to rip out.

MoldingStep-10

Panels

MoldingStep-11

9. Measure the size you want your panels to be and use the circular saw to cut the panels on 45-degree angles. We used about 30 pieces for this room.
10. Set up a stop on the saw so that the lumber is the same cut every time.

MoldingStep-13

11. Using a level, tape measure and pencil, mark the sections of the wall where the panels will go.

MoldingStep-14

12. Apply DAP liquid adhesive to the back of the horizontal top section, and apply the section to the wall.
13. Nail the horizontal top piece to the wall. Use fewer nails here than on the chair rail, because the trim is more fragile.

MoldingStep-20

14. Next, nail the vertical pieces in place, then move on to the bottom horizontal pieces. Make sure the miters are in the right place, and nail them off.
15. We marked the wall with one 90-degree angle on each panel, which ensures the other corner will be 90 degrees. We spaced the panels five inches apart.
16. Apply adhesive to the back, attach the panel flush against the wall and then nail off the new panel.
17. Continue this process throughout room.

Crown molding

MoldingStep-22

18. Paint crown blocks and crown molding.
19. Measure and cut the crown molding.
20. Apply a small amount of glue to the back of the crown block, and apply to the corners. These crown blocks let you skip mitering the corners of the crown molding.

21. Put the crown corner into place and then nail it off with the pneumatic nailer.
22. The bottom section of crown should sit flush against the wall. Then you can slide it into place.
23. Nail the crown molding into the studs along the wall. Typically studs are located every 16 inches.
24. Put a couple of nails through the top of the crown molding into the ceiling beam.
25. There may be a gap at the top of the crown, which you can fill with caulk.

MoldingStep-27

26. When you reach the opposite corner, install the crown block and then measure and cut the joining piece of crown with the circular saw at a 30-degree angle. This will make the cut less noticeable on the ceiling. You can apply caulk to the inside edge to make the cut invisible, and then nail it into the wall.
27. Continue crown molding and block process around the room.

Next Up

On TV

See Full Schedule

Catch Up With Our Blogs

We're serving up the latest news, gorgeous style, crafty DIY projects, clever entertaining tips and more. Consider these your design digests.

Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss HGTV in your favorite social media feeds.