Big City Digs: Hotels of the Rich and Famous

Peek inside exclusive hotels where celebrities chill and high-power deals are made in Los Angeles, Dallas, New York City, Boston and Washington, D.C.

Ink48, New York City

Located in the trendy, up-and-coming Hell's Kitchen neighborhood, guests can take in sweeping views of Midtown and the Hudson River from this hotel's rooftop bar — widely considered one of Manhattan's best. Movers and shakers and tourists alike can kick back in the surprisingly comfy low rattan chairs while enjoying a cocktail and a bird's-eye view of the city. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

The Mark, New York City

Built in 1927, this historic property underwent a total redesign in 2009 by famed French designer Jacques Grange to reopen as one of the top luxury hotels in New York. Located in Manhattan's ritzy Upper East Side, The Mark is comparable to St. Regis or The Plaza, but you won't find any gilt moldings or crystal chandeliers here. Instead, the decor is contemporary with an emphasis on bold colors, graphic patterns and just a touch of glitz. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

Avalon Hotel, Beverly Hills, Calif.

Tucked into a quiet residential corner of L.A.'s celebrity enclave is this undeniably chic boutique hotel. Formerly the Beverly Carlton, the property was artfully redesigned in 1999 by style icon Kelly Wearstler to create her take on a midcentury Italian aesthetic. To achieve this look, she combined vintage furnishings with an aqua terrazzo floor and dramatically veined Cipollino marble walls. Image courtesy of Avalon Beverly Hills

The Jefferson, Washington, D.C.

In homage to Founding Father Thomas Jefferson's love of reading, the hotel's cozy library stocks contemporary newspapers and magazines, plus vintage hardcover books about the Jefferson era. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

W Hotel, Dallas, Texas

Located in the upscale Victory Park area of downtown Dallas, the W's lobby, featuring oversize tufted sofas and massive crystal chandeliers, proves the old adage that, at least in Texas, bigger is better. The hotel is also home to trendy nightspot Ghostbar and celebrity Chef Tom Colicchio's Craft restaurant, making this hotel a must for both club kids and foodies. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

The Hay-Adams, Washington, D.C.

A restful color palette, luxurious Frette linens, antique furnishings and an elaborately detailed ceiling are not all that this posh suite has going for it. It's also one of the few D.C. hotel rooms with views of the White House, Washington Monument and Lafayette Park, aptly nicknamed the Obamas' backyard. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

Ink48, New York City

Designed by innovative architects David Rockwell and Carlos Zapata, the hotel's lobby feels warm, open and luxurious. Plush peacock blue velvet sofas and polished stone floors are a sleek complement to the wood-clad ceilings. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

The St. Regis, New York City

Inarguably a New York City landmark, the hotel's century-old Beaux-Arts features draw tourists and art aficionados alike to marvel at the Waterford crystal chandeliers, heavily detailed moldings and impeccable trompe-l'oeil murals. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

Maison 140, Beverly Hills, Calif.

Tucked within the intimate 43-room boutique hotel located just steps from Rodeo Drive, Bar Noir attracts only the most sophisticated of L.A.'s barflies who come for nightly absinthe tastings and to enjoy designer Kelly Wearstler's contemporary interpretation of French Chinoiserie style. Image courtesy of Maison 140

Taj Boston, Boston, Mass.

Opened in 1927, this landmark hotel boasts Beaux-Arts architecture and a premier address in Boston's historic Back Bay neighborhood. Guest suites are sumptuous, filled with European antiques and custom-designed touches. After a day spent touring the city, the beds are a soft place to land with Frette linens and cushy goose-down pillows, duvets and featherbeds. Image courtesy of Taj Boston

Crosby Street Hotel, New York City

Off a quiet cobblestone street in the heart of trendy SoHo is this first U.S. hotel for British boutique hotel chain Firmdale. Designer Kit Kemp gave the lobby's drawing room a collected-over-time look with global finds, original artwork and her own delightfully quirky and oh-so English aesthetic. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

Avalon Hotel, Beverly Hills, Calif.

To create a light and airy dining experience for the hotel's celebrity clientele, designer Kelly Wearstler paired vintage 1960s Warren Platner chairs, sculptural Italian ceramic columns and aqua terrazzo floors with floor-to-ceiling windows that overlook the equally hip pool area. Image courtesy of Avalon Beverly Hills

The Jefferson, Washington, D.C.

Located in the heart of old downtown, just a short walk from the White House and other must-see historic sites, this luxury hotel underwent a massive renovation in 2009 to bring the nearly century-old building into the 21st century. The designers added high-tech features like TVs hidden in mirrors and bedside housekeeping buttons to complement the room's sophisticated design. Another hidden feature is a nod to Jefferson's work as an architect: The custom-designed toile bedding features images of Monticello, the Founding Father's Virginia estate. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

L'Ermitage, Beverly Hills, Calif.

Hidden away on a secluded residential street, the hotel's A-list guests can enter and exit the property without being snapped by paparazzi via an underground VIP-only entrance. Once inside, celebs and Hollywood power brokers can enjoy a light lunch or broker a deal at the hotel's rooftop restaurant. Image courtesy of L'Ermitage

The Mark, New York City

With its black-and-white striped marble floor and Italian marble tub surround, the hotel's art deco-inspired bathrooms certainly don't scrimp on style. They're also big on hidden features: The mirror contains an embedded TV screen, and towel racks are heated so guests can step out of the tub into a toasty warm towel. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

Taj Boston, Boston, Mass.

The hotel's prime location, in one of the city's oldest and most prestigious neighborhoods, provides sweeping views of the nation's first public botanical garden and several of the city's famous landmarks. Available for private functions, the rooftop lounge has a history as storied as the hotel itself: This is where Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey and Artie Shaw played during the Big Band era. Image courtesy of Taj Boston

The Mark, New York City

Adjacent to the hotel's foodie mecca — The Mark Restaurant by Jean-Georges, where renowned Chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten whips up his signature European fare — is this funky bar area where A-list celebrity sightings, such as Paul McCartney, Barbara Walters, Mick Jagger and Woody Allen, are common. Image courtesy of Oyster.com

The Pierre, New York City

With its prime Upper East Side address overlooking Central Park, The Pierre's rotunda reflects the hotel's tony location. Artist Edward Melcarth painted the breathtaking trompe l'oeil murals in 1967, combining classic scenes of Greco/Roman deities with what many consider to be portraits of affluent people of the time. For instance, a woman with young children bears a striking resemblance to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Image courtesy of The Pierre

Crosby Street Hotel, New York City

As one of the first Manhattan hotels to achieve gold LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification, the Crosby takes green seriously. Creative use of recycled materials, energy efficient lighting and the extensive use of low-VOC building materials, such as carpets, paints and stains, all contributed to this prestigious designation. Image courtesy of Oyster.com