A Texas Home Where Timeless Meets Trendy

HGTV Magazine takes you inside a home with style that is a little refined and a little relaxed.

Photo By: David A. Land; Styled by Courtney de Wet

Photo By: David A. Land; Styled by Courtney de Wet

Photo By: David A. Land; Styled by Courtney de Wet

Photo By: David A. Land; Styled by Courtney de Wet

Photo By: David A. Land; Styled by Courtney de Wet

Photo By: David A. Land; Styled by Courtney de Wet

Photo By: David A. Land; Styled by Courtney de Wet

The House

In 2012 Rebecca and Jeff Delaney were ready to reboot their style. The couple, who had just moved from an apartment in Washington, D.C., to a 1940s brick Colonial in Houston, TX, figured this was the moment to ditch their mishmash of postcollege furniture and decorate like adults. But as hip urban parents, they were also apprehensive. “We wanted to grow up —  a little,” she says. “The rooms still had to be fun.”

Big-ticket fixes to the 2,100-square-foot house, including ripping out some drywall to replace the wiring, meant there wasn’t much wiggle room in the decorating budget for do-overs. Teaming with interior designer Ashley Goforth, they formulated a splurge-versus-save strategy: Invest in forever-chic classics with simple lines and neutral colors, then keep things current with affordable, up-to-the-minute extras. Although Rebecca admits that striking a just-right balance was sometimes tricky, she’s happy with how everything turned out. “We managed to respect the age of the house and still create rooms we love to live in,” she says.  

Living Room

After choosing pieces with staying power for the living room — a custom flax-color sectional, a wool rug from Stanton — Rebecca brought in some va-va-voom with a gilded Lam Bespoke coffee table and a plush blue velvet chair. The stripes on the storage ottoman (the lid lifts up) play off the zigzag art from One Kings Lane. “I am super into chevrons,” says Rebecca. “Ashley, our designer, convinced me to restrict them to accessories I could easily swap out.” 


The previous owners had boosted the Colonial’s curb appeal with blue-painted siding and brick, but Rebecca and Jeff felt the entry lacked pizzazz. To give the facade a facelift — and bring more light into the house — they flanked the front door with new sidelights. The finishing touch: fire-engine red paint (Show Stopper by Sherwin-Williams) for the front door. 

Dining Room

Drapes in striped black-and-white linen by Kravet kicked off the traditional-with-a-twist dining room. Nonmatching seating, including Restoration Hardware chairs and a made-to-order bench in a sea glass blue Duralee fabric, loosened up the formal Dinec table. Mixing metals, like the gold color of the Wisteria mirror and the polished nickel of the chandelier, continued the unstuffy vibe. The marine blue ceramic lamps are from Robert Abbey.


Rebecca and Jeff kept the existing black-and-white kitchen mostly as is, proving the durability of straightforward design. A few of the biggest changes: They swapped out the vintage stove for a stainless steel version and hung a yellow-and-white-chevron shade sewn from Jonathan Adler fabric that’s “pure sunshine,” says Rebecca. The striped rug is from HomeGoods. 


To make old feel new, Rebecca modernized a plywood cabinet that’s been in her family since the 1950s — it was built by her grandfather for her dad when he was a boy — with a custom shade of high-gloss yellow paint. The rustic kid-size table by local store New Living is crafted from salvaged wood and paired with Pottery Barn Kids chairs. Dapper animal portraits bought on Etsy and popped into identical frames from Michaels repeat the colors in the Flor carpet tiles. 

Master Bedroom

A custom bed with a large-scale headboard and curved-front Longoria Collection nightstands deliver major personality to the master bedroom. To soften all the buttoned-up grays, Rebecca added pink ceramic Robert Abbey lamps and floral pillows sewn from Duralee fabric. The chair and ottoman, passed down from Rebecca’s grandmother, were updated with a graphic Duralee fabric.