'Vintage Flip' is Back for Season Two

Tina and Jessie Rodriguez have great things in store for the new season of their old-home renovation series — and a new addition of their own.

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Tina and Jessie Rodriguez of HGTV's Vintage Flip

Tina and Jessie Rodriguez of HGTV's Vintage Flip

In case you haven’t been paying close attention, or been busy making summer plans, there’s a whole lot happening on HGTV lately. And one of the bright spots is the return of Vintage Flip. The popular show is back for a second season of vintage-home makeovers, SoCal-style, with stars and husband-wife co-hosts Jessie and Tina Rodriguez.

So here’s a quick review: Jessie's a real estate pro as well as a licensed contractor, and Tina has a passion for design and decorating. They both love vintage homes and, together, they started a house-flipping business — Cal American Homes — and now have more than 250 property renovations to their credit. Both Tina and Jessie care about the architecture and period attributes that make old homes special, and they strive deliberately to preserve those aspects in their renovations.

The work we do is more than flipping. We want the families who buy our restored homes to love and appreciate them.
Tina

Want additional scoop on this high-energy power duo? Read: 10 Things to Know About Jessie and Tina Rodriguez from Vintage Flip. There you’ll find out how the two of them met, how HGTV discovered them, which of them had an (extremely) short childhood acting career, plus the contents of Tina’s purse (?).

And check out their Instagram account for updates on their projects, exploits and family adventures (not to mention evidence that Jessie does love a good selfie).

Vintage Flip’s new season of 14 half-hour episodes, airing in HGTV’s Thursday night lineup, features the couple’s latest undertakings as they buy, renovate and resell century-old homes in historic and revitalizing communities in and around Los Angeles.

From Vintage Flip Season Two

From Vintage Flip Season Two

Right out of the gate you’ll get to see them take on a 1912 bungalow in San Dimas, Calif., a quaint 1924 tract home located directly across the street from an old railroad station in downtown Upland and a stately 1914 Craftsman in Claremont. That’s just for starters. 

The Railroad Tract House, Before

After

Oh, and here’s a spoiler. (Well, not much of one since it’s mentioned in the new season's show open.) In this season's arc we'll be seeing a new member of the Rodriguez family. Stay tuned.

And baby makes five.

And baby makes five.

New episodes of  Vintage Flip air on HGTV every Thursday at 11p|10c. Keep checking back here for new photo galleries, videos and updates. And follow along on social: #VintageFlip.

See a Gallery from Season One

See All Photos

Hillside Bungalow With a Million Dollar View

An updated exterior, full interior remodel, expanded patio and new deck helped Jessie and Tina realize a profit of around $194,000 on this property. As seen here on the newly refurbished guest house, a bold color palette of dark charcoal with mustard-yellow trim gives the home a distinctive look that's well suited to the eclectic vibe of this revitalizing LA neighborhood.

BEFORE

The home was built in 1920, had two bedrooms, two baths, sat on a large lot and was about 1500 square feet. Jessie and Tina purchased the property for $499,000 with plans to invest about $150,000 in upgrades. Prior to the renovation the house was in serious disrepair and was badly lacking in both privacy and curb appeal. It was covered in metal siding, had a non-original add-on porch overhang and the landscaping was badly overgrown.

AFTER

As seen with the structure next door, a number of the neighborhood's vintage homes have been torn down and replaced by new construction. For this home, though, Tina and Jessie were determined to retain and restore the original architecture while still updating the home to appeal to contemporary buyers. For the front exterior they added a privacy wall and extended the patio forward for a large but private outdoor space. For the open house, Tina staged the home to emphasize the its potential for indoor/outdoor living.

BEFORE

A second structure on the property had been vacant for more than 40 years and, as seen here, was badly deteriorated. If salvageable, however, it could serve as a guest house or rental unit — potentially escalating the home's overall value. 

AFTER

The guest house was in such bad shape that saving it meant taking it down to the studs and essentially rebuilding it. The only major original feature retained was the original hardwood flooring which was restored and refinished. A wood deck was added at the rear of the main house, providing an outdoor space that takes advantage of the home's amazing view of the LA skyline. 

Behind the Scenes

Jessie and Tina were excited to find the original wood siding intact once the metal siding was removed. "I'm so glad we're saving this bungalow and keeping it era-specific," said Tina. The total renovation budget for the property included $70,000 for the main house, $50,000 for rebuilding the guest house and $30,000 for refurbishing the exterior and adding the back deck.

Behind the Scenes

Jessie applies a dark stain to custom windows made for the living room on the main house. The staining for all new woodwork was carefully matched for a unified look.

Behind the Scenes

Tina shops for hex tiles in pastel colors for a period-specific look in the restored kitchen. Though the original kitchen tile was not salvageable, Tina used the original kitchen design, including color palette and materials, for inspiration. "The tilework that was in this kitchen was classic 1920s," she said. "I want to use the hexagon tile and all the colors that were here — green, yellow, black, and white. They're so authentic to the time period."

BEFORE

The kitchen was in rough shape and required a full-fledged remodel.

AFTER

Because the kitchen was small, Tina and Jessie went with a simple L-shaped layout. They used basic cabinets, white for the upper and black for the lower; both in high-gloss finish. The white hex-tile backsplash helps create a retro look that references the era in which the home was built.

BEFORE

The original kitchen tile unfortunately could not be salvaged, but Jessie and Tina did find some unused vintage tile stored in the guest house and they were able to incorporate that elsewhere in the remodel. They also discovered some old some black-and-white photos that showed the main house from years earlier and they were able to use those to help guide the renovation.

AFTER

The old range was replaced with this vintage Vulcan "Smoothtop" gas range that Jessie and Tina discovered in the guest house. The piece was fully refurbished by antique renovation specialist Jimmy Rodriquez. Fixtures were re-chromed and damaged porcelain repaired. The unit is now fully functional and includes an enclosed warming shelf.

Living Room, BEFORE

Prior to the renovation, the interior spaces had a mix of styles, but little that was original. Tina and Jessie wanted to restore the home in a manner that was true to its history and give the entire home a cohesive look.

Living Room, AFTER

Hardwood floors and custom windows with dark wood frames help return the living room to a more classic style.

Living Room, AFTER

Removal of the wall between the kitchen and living room left a stairwell exposed. Jessie and Tina installed a custom floor-to-ceiling shelf unit which functions as a partition as well as a design element. The shelves are unpainted wood and the metal supports were hand welded and powder-coated in black.

BEFORE

One design challenge was the single bathroom on the main floor. In the original floor plan, guests would have to use the bathroom off the master bedroom. 

AFTER

The modified floorplan incorporated the addition of a half-bath as well as a full remodel of this en suite master bath.

Master Suite, BEFORE

The master bedroom, prior to the renovation, was drab and dated with dark wood paneling and worn-out carpeting.

Master Suite, AFTER

The space is brightened and transformed with hardwood floors in a light finish, white walls, upgraded lighting and a sliding door for the remodeled master bath.

Value in Vintage

Jessie and Tina purchased the hillside bungalow for just under $500,000 and the final renovation costs were $157,000. They put the house on the market for $899,000 and, after three days on the market got an offer for $950,000. A successful closing would bring a profit of around $194,000.

Flip Happy

If you enjoyed this Vintage Flip makeover, you might also like this one, also from Jessie and Tina: 
A Ranch House Reno in Rancho Cucamonga

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