From Desperate Kitchens to Kitchens of Distinction

John and Anthony bring the special sauce to another fine batch of kitchen makeovers in HGTV's inspirational-transformational kitchen show, America's Most Desperate Kitchens.

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The final two episodes of HGTV's hot kitchen-design show, America's Most Desperate Kitchens, make their network premiere tonight, putting the capper on another arc of episodes featuring some truly innovative and eye-catching kitchen makeovers.

Exposed Brick and Glass Paneled Cabinets Highlight Farmhouse Design in Kitchen

Exposed Brick and Glass Paneled Cabinets Highlight Farmhouse Design in Kitchen

This newly updated kitchen is in a New Jersey farmhouse that's more than a century old.

From: America's Most Desperate Kitchens

Photo by: Chris Amaral

Chris Amaral

This newly updated kitchen is in a New Jersey farmhouse that's more than a century old.

As always, Kitchen Cousins John Colaneri and Anthony Carrino come to the rescue of homeowners eager to make the case that their kitchens are worthy of the dubious distinction of "Most Desperate." And, as always, the duo manages not only to breathe new life into some formerly drab, dank and supremely dysfunctional spaces, they find a way to incorporate at least one razzle-dazzle, rock-star feature that both wows the homeowners and makes the revealed end-result buzzworthy and share-worthy among design aficionados. And they do it all on-camera with their trademark endearing — and occasionally hilarious — panache.

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John and Anthony with homeowners Bobby (center left) Hyatt (center right) in their newly remodeled kitchen.

John and Anthony with homeowners Bobby (center left) Hyatt (center right) in their newly remodeled kitchen.

So let's take a moment to review some highlight spaces and features from the show's second season, starting with the project from the season premiere. 

Retro-Modern Kitchen and Bar

For their first new project, John and Anthony update a tiny galley kitchen in Sacramento, Calif., transforming it into a large entertaining space with a custom bar and a midcentury feel.

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As seen on America’s Most Desperate Kitchens, this renovated Sacramento, California kitchen features matching octogonal wall and floor tiles, stainless appliances and an eat in counter with upholstered stools. (After)

Photo by: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Midcentury is an appropriate touchstone for this project since the home was built in the 1950s, and originally belonged to the grandfather of one of the current owners. Like many homes from that era, the kitchen was a tiny galley, was isolated from the rest of the house and — far from being a classically endearing time capsule from the Don Draper era — had through later updates picked up vestiges of the '70s, '80s and '90s. Among the key offenses in the visual hodge-podge were contractor-basic wood cabinets, avocado green appliances, dingy yellow tile countertops and a section of laminate flooring that one of the homeowners described as looking like "a clown explosion."

BEFORE

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AFTER

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Martin Klimek/Getty Images

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As seen on America’s Most Desperate Kitchens, this renovated Sacramento, California kitchen features matching octogonal wall and floor tiles, stainless appliances and an eat in counter with upholstered stools. (After)

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

If you're a regular follower of John and Anthony, it will probably come as no surprise that this project got underway by taking out a wall to enlarge the kitchen and merge it both visually and functionally with the adjacent living room. They added a massive island – actually, at 12 feet by 4 feet, the largest one the cousins had yet installed — along with bar seating, thus eliminating the need for the tiny dining room that was hardly being used anyway. Presto! The dreary dining space is transformed into a stylish wet bar at one end of the kitchen's expanded footprint.

BEFORE

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AFTER

Large Island Provides Generous Storage for Open Kitchen
Martin Klimek/Getty Images

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Large Island Provides Generous Storage for Open Kitchen

As seen on HGTV's America's Most Desperate Kitchens, designers were able to open up the floor plan to create a larger kitchen space and to add a large island with integrated range and a generous amount of storage space. A pass through window was closed off to convert the old dining room into a bar area with additional storage.

Other highlights in the overall transformation included ceiling height cabinetry, floating shelves, a wine fridge and custom metal doors mounted on rolling sliders. The metal doors, with an abstract design that evokes '60s era modern art, were handmade by John and Anthony with help and guidance from metal artist Terrence Martin of Jagged Edge — a custom metalwork shop in West Sacramento.

Contemporary Bar Area Adjacent to Renovated, Retro Kitchen

Contemporary Bar Area Adjacent to Renovated, Retro Kitchen

As seen on America's Most Desperate Kitchens, designers Anthony and John created a separate bar area just off the kitchen. To delineate the two spaces, designers used bold, blue cabinets and a gray countertop, creating visual separation from the adjoining kitchen space. Then, they added a three dimensional backsplash and two long shelves for storage. A final bit of decorative flair is added with the sliding barn door that matches the one concealing the pantry.

From: America's Most Desperate Kitchens

Photo by: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Martin Klimek/Getty Images

And as is often the case, the Cousins didn't stop their renovation at the boundaries of the kitchen, but expanded the improvements into the living area that the kitchen now opened onto. They updated the original period fireplace with neutral gray paint and removed scalloped trim, replacing it with flat trim for cleaner lines. They then furnished the room with a complement of contemporary pieces that also evokes the early '60s.

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The Living Room, AFTER

The Living Room, AFTER

What's more, to bridge the two spaces, John and Anthony integrated the black-white-and-gray hex tile floor of the kitchen with the hardwood of the living room by means of hex cutouts in the periphery of the wood floor – so that tile and wood were joined together like jigsaw-puzzle pieces. "This is what is making this kitchen," John said, "We really want to make sure that it looks perfect and that we blur the lines between the kitchen and living room."

As seen on America’s Most Desperate Kitchens, this renovated Sacramento, California kitchen features matching octogonal wall and floor tiles. (After)

Photo by: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Martin Klimek/Getty Images

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Retro Mod Kitchen

Anthony and John took a dated kitchen with a narrow, cramped layout and opened it up to the adjacent living room to create this contemporary space that's ideally suited to cooking, serving, dining and entertaining.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Retro Mod Kitchen

The home, in the Woodlake community just outside Sacramento, Calif., was built in the 1950s and originally belonged to the grandfather of one of the current owners. Prior to this transformation, the home's small galley-style kitchen was awkwardly configured and isolated from the rest of the house.

Retro Mod Kitchen

Modern appliances, updated lighting and cabinetry and a massive new island are just some of the dramatic improvements that John and Anthony brought to this fully remodeled space.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Meet the Homeowners

Hosts John and Anthony pose for a group shot with homeowners Bobby (center left) Hyatt (center right) in the finished kitchen. Bobby and Hyatt have owned the house for about a year. They had made a few upgrades but didn't feel comfortable taking on a major kitchen remodel themselves. Their wish list included: a modern aesthetic and contemporary design, a relatively neutral palette and an open floor plan that's well suited for entertaining guests.

Kitchen, BEFORE

Though the house was built in the 1950s, various subsequent remodels had left the kitchen with traces of the '70s, '80s and '90s. The wood cabinets were pure '90s vintage and super-basic. The countertops had the look of old floor tiles, and a raised lip around their edges was becoming detached. The aging range was – like the worn laminate floor seen here – avocado green. And could there be any a greater cliche for a dated kitchen than avocado green appliances? (Editor's note: Beware rushing to judgment. Ironic or not, avocado appliances are likely to make a comeback back any day now.)

Kitchen, AFTER

The remodeled kitchen features new ceiling-height cabinets, white quartz countertops and the largest kitchen island yet installed by John and Anthony. The new island is 12 feet long with an overall 4-foot depth. The island's large serving space essentially allows it to function as an informal dining-room table thereby eliminating the need for the old dining room – which could then be modified and incorporated into the kitchen's expanded footprint.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, BEFORE

At one end of the kitchen was a dining area too small to be of much use, a pass-through that was serving no real purpose and, butted up to the avocado floor, still more laminate flooring – this time in a mottled multicolor pattern that Hyatt termed "a clown explosion." The closed off space offered no opportunity for interaction between hosts in the kitchen and guests in the main living area.

Kitchen, AFTER

By opening up the floorplan, Anthony and John not only connected the kitchen visually with the adjacent living room, but made room to add a massive island with integrated range and a generous amount of serving space. The former pass-through window was closed off to convert the former dining area into a new bar area with additional storage and some specialized features and accessories.

Retro Mod Kitchen

At the opposite end of the kitchen, a former coat closet was converted into a pantry with a unique sliding door. The kitchen sink remains in the same location as before, but the old one is replaced with an apron-front model in contemporary design with brushed stainless front. The sturdy pro-grade faucet features a flexible design and pull-out sprayer.

Kitchen, AFTER

A new refrigerator and dishwasher are added, also in brushed stainless finish, and a floating architectural hood is suspended directly over the center island. Open cantilevered shelving behind the sink provides functional storage and easy access for dishware.

Kitchen and Living Room, AFTER

Seating at the island, and an open sight-line to the living room, allows the hosts to be prepping food in the kitchen while still conversing and interacting with guests. The living room also gets a full makeover as part of the renovation.

Living Room, AFTER

The contemporary design, as well as the blue and gray color scheme, extends to the newly redecorated living room. New furniture additions include a large sectional sofa, matching coffee-table ottoman, patterned area rug and contemporary end table and credenza.

Kitchen, AFTER

For the kitchen's signature touch, John and Anthony used large hex tiles in a striking black, gray and white pattern for the ceiling-height backsplash. That same pattern extends to the floor tile, following the same palette, and then connecting in an interlocking pattern into hex wood cutouts – thus creating a transition into the wood flooring in the redesigned living room.

Kitchen, Detail

To achieve the transition effect, tile outlines were cut in the hardwood floor. "This is what is making this kitchen," John said, "We really want to make sure that it looks perfect and that we blur the lines between the kitchen and living room."

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

Upholstered bar chairs in blue-gray heather provide comfortable seating for four at the expansive kitchen island.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

The blender, in deep blue custom finish, is color-matched to coordinate with the new cabinetry in the bar area.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

The Wet Bar

The newly added bar features a contemporary design with dark gray countertops, bar sink, drawer storage and floating wood shelves for dishes and barware. A deep blue color for the bar cabinetry creates a visual separation between the kitchen and bar spaces.The backsplash is in bright white with a three-dimensional tile. The two long shelves over the bar were installed using metal cleats that are anchored to the walls. The shelves slip over the cleats so no mounting hardware or support is visible. "We have amazing backsplash tile," says John, "We didn't want to cover it up."

Wet Bar, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Wet Bar, Detail

The bar area incorporates a variety of deluxe features including a built-in wine refrigerator and this high-end coffee brewer.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Statement Piece

A custom metal door, with an abstract design that evokes '60s era modern art, is mounted over the shelving using sliding barn-door hardware. The metal inlays for the sliding doors were custom created by John and Anthony with help and guidance from metal artist Terrence Martin of Jagged Edge — a custom metalwork shop in West Sacramento. They were fashioned using a random assortment of scrap metal pieces — some rusted, some shiny or painted — for a look that's both abstract and industrial.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Statement Piece

A matching metal door in similar design is mounted to serve as a pantry door at the far end of the kitchen. The track mounting uses old mechanical parts that are deliberately left rusty, adding to the overall industrial effect of the piece. "Adding the sliding door to what was a coat closet, now creating a pantry, creates a much more usable space" says Anthony. "When the door is open, it stays flush against the wall."

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Statement Piece

The designed metal inserts were covered with a clear-coat protective finish. Anthony then created wide picture-frame mountings using square joints, rather than miter joints, to mimic the rustic look of an actual barn door. The corners were fastened, and the metal inlay secured within the frame, using 8-inch lag bolts and screws. 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, AFTER

The shelves, as well as the frames for the custom barn doors, are stained in a tone to match the wood cabinets and island base – a clear base with a hint of charcoal to coordinate visually with the white and gray tones of the countertops and backsplash tiles. "The shelves have the same semi-opaque finish as all the kitchen cabinets," says Anthony, "so we tied the design from the cabinets to the shelves. Everything has a cohesive look."

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, AFTER

Engineered quartz countertops in bright white are used for the kitchen island and back counter, while a dark gray surface with silver undertones is used for the bar countertop.

BEFORE

The rear wall seen here is the one that was removed to merge the living room and kitchen.

The Living Room

Living Room, Detail

For the fireplace, John and Anthony retained the original brick to maintain the mid-century look, but painted it in a neutral gray. They also modified the dated wood surround, removing scalloped trim and replacing it with flat trim to create cleaner lines. The wood mantel and built-in bookshelves are painted in a rich medium blue; the color scheme matches that of the cabinetry and countertops in the new bar area.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, BEFORE

Like the galley kitchen, the living room layout prior to the renovation was oblong, narrow and not very inviting.

Living Room, AFTER

With walls removed, the living space now pulls in more light and has a whole new sense of space.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, BEFORE

Living Room, AFTER

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

The modern-styled gray sectional sofa is accented with throw pillows in white, gray and shades of blue.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

A coffee-table ottoman has removable cushions and accent trays so it can also do double duty for serving drinks and snacks.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

A glass-top end table with gray metal frame coordinates well with the living room's patterned area rug.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

For additional functional storage, a wooden credenza was selected in a wood finish that ties in with the hardwood flooring as well as the custom wood cabinetry and shelving in the kitchen.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

The clean lines and flush hardware tie in well with the generally contemporary feel of the new space.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

The rustic wood credenza is paired with a generous sized leather chair with modern design.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

HGTV's Kitchen Heroes are Back!

Kitchen Cousins John and Anthony are back for a second season of America's Most Desperate Kitchens. If you enjoyed this kitchen makeover, you might also enjoy this gallery from season one: Desperate Kitchen No More: Extravagant Pub-Style Kitchen

Jersey Farmhouse Kitchen

In a very different kind of kitchen, and a different sort of makeover, John and Anthony headed to Lafayatte, New Jersey to update a 100-year-old farmhouse kitchen, creating a distinctive design that combines both modern and rustic elements. For this project, and according to the wishes of the homeowners, preserving (or, in the case of the kitchen, reviving) the home's original farmhouse feel was paramount. Indeed, if the kitchen had once possessed a quaint turn-of-the-(last)-century country charm, it had largely been lost, and judging from the evidence on hand, it likely happened sometime in the 1970s.

Bright Objects Keeps Corners Light

Bright Objects Keeps Corners Light

As seen on America's Most Desperate Kitchens, designers brightened a dark corner space by adding colored plants, fruits and colorful, vintage glass bottles. To help keep the small space feeling open and bright, glass paneled upper cabinets were installed helping to create an authentic, vintage feel to the space.

From: America's Most Desperate Kitchens

Photo by: Chris Amaral

Chris Amaral

"This kitchen is making us blue" … was how homeowner Katie summed up the home's dated, barely functional kitchen. Prior to the renovation it had blue laminate flooring, sky-blue countertops and backsplash, a blue patterned wallpaper border and dated cabinets. It also had no dishwasher, and the oven/range combo had seen better days.

Jersey Farmhouse Kitchen, BEFORE

America's Most Desperate Kitchens

Jersey Farmhouse Kitchen, AFTER

Mint Green Details Connect Spaces and Maintain an Authentic Design
Chris Amaral

America's Most Desperate Kitchens

Before shot of the New Jersey kitchen chosen by cousins Anthony Carrino and John Colaneri to be renovated on America's Most Desperate Kitchens.

Mint Green Details Connect Spaces and Maintain an Authentic Design

To add color to the updated, yet still authentic feeling kitchen and dining room spaces, designers on America's Most Desperate Kitchens continued the mint green color from the kitchen into the dining room. The mint green of the refrigerator and the KitchenAid reflect flecks of mint green in the custom, large print tile floor. The same accent color enters the dining room with the vintage, mint green pendant light.

John and Anthony began by removing hanging cabinets to open up the sightline to the adjacent dining room. They also reworked the kitchen peninsula, wrapping it in reclaimed wood, and integrated a new range. And they unwrapped an original brick column that had previously been covered with drywall, bringing the warmth of exposed brick back into the space.

Vintage Features in an Updated, Farmhouse Kitchen
Chris Amaral
America's Most Desperate Kitchens
Chris Amaral

Vintage Features in an Updated, Farmhouse Kitchen

As seen on America's Most Desperate Kitchens, the aim of this kitchen remodel was an updated farmhouse design, so designers left vintage elements, such as the glass paneled cabinets and exposed brick, in the space. Then, they added a reclaimed wood door to cover the entrance to the pantry. Updates in the space include a durable, quartz countertop, a white subway tile backsplash, and modern, stainless steel appliances.

America's Most Desperate Kitchens

The old antique wood breakfast bar, sits on top of an engineered wood patterned floor that is from the cafe line of floors from Mirth Studios. The floor pattern is meant to have a classic farm house feel and of a cafe as well. As seen on America's Most Desperate Kitchens.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

The star attraction in this project had to be the creative use of wood. In addition to the reclaimed wood on the base of the peninsula, the cousins wrapped a new LVL support beam in wood taken from an old hand-hewn beam, giving it a rough and rustic look. They also fashioned a new pantry door using aged wood from a barn in Ohio, complete with moon-and-star cutouts, and they replaced old laminate flooring with engineered wood tiles in a classic and elegant pattern and soft gray tones.

Combine all that with a classic apron-front farmhouse sink, black quartz countertops, glass-front cabinets and a new-but-vintage-look Smeg refrigerator in pastel green, and you've got one decidedly smart-looking kitchen that's still aesthetically in keeping with the home's age and history.

America's Most Desperate Kitchens
Chris Amaral
Vintage Inspired Refrigerator and Tile Give Kitchen an Authentic Look
Chris Amaral

America's Most Desperate Kitchens

A classic farm house kitchen sink was used to keep the antique farm house feel of the home. As seen on America's Most Desperate Kitchens.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Vintage Inspired Refrigerator and Tile Give Kitchen an Authentic Look

To create the perfect vintage, farmhouse look, designers at America's Most Desperate Kitchens added a new, pastel green Smeg refrigerator. Despite its retro design, it has all the modern gadgets of a stainless steel fridge in a cute, kitschy package. To complete the design, custom large pattern tile flooring and an exposed beam gives the space an authentic farmhouse feel.

Of course, not satisfied with only the kitchen, John and Anthony furnished the adjoining dining room following a suitably rustic and antiquated motif and creating a cohesive look for the two spaces. "The important thing for us here is that this is a very historic home," said Anthony, "It's very clear that [the homeowners] bought this home wanting to respect history, and we wanted to work within that."

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Jersey Farmhouse Kitchen

John and Anthony blended old and new motifs to enhance both function and aesthetics in this farmhouse kitchen in a home that's more than a century old.

Jersey Farmhouse Kitchen

The home is in the New Jersey farmlands, about an hour west of Jersey City. It sits on ten acres of land and was built around 1900. In the newly remodeled dining room seen here, highlights include a large farmhouse table, vintage wooden console and a sliding door made using antique barn wood. Simple vintage chairs were painted black to give them a new, clean look. The pendant light features a mint green shade that coordinates with fixtures in the adjacent kitchen.

Jersey Farmhouse Kitchen

For a look that's cohesive with the kitchen, the adjacent dining room gets new white paint and dark gray wainscoating. Accent elements of mint green and pale blue also help to tie the two spaces together visually.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Kitchen, Before

Homeowners Nate and Katie Bennett purchased the country home with hopes of starting a small working farm. They loved the home's history, but the kitchen – likely updated in the 1970s – had lost some of its original and authentic farmhouse charm.

Kitchen, After

John and Anthony's design optimized the existing floor plan and opened up the sight lines between the kitchen and dining room while staying true to the home's original country aesthetic.

Kitchen, Before

"This kitchen is making us blue." That was how homeowner Katie summed up their old, barely functional kitchen. Prior to the renovation it had blue laminate flooring, sky-blue countertops and backsplash, a blue patterned wallpaper border and dated cabinets.

Kitchen, After

The Cousins brightened up the space with all new white cabinets, counter-to-ceiling subway tile backsplash, contrasting countertops, updated lighting and a new refrigerator in mint green. The bright white palette and open cabinet design helpmake the space feel larger.

Kitchen, Before

Homeowners Nate and Katie Bennett were eager for an upgrade for their outdated kitchen and dining room – Katie is a culinary teacher – but they didn't want to alter the overall vibe of the home. They wanted to preserve the fine craftsmanship that was a hallmark of the period in which the house was built. They described the look they were seeking as "antique/updated."

Kitchen, After

The homeowners' renovation wish-list included a more open floor plan, an improved kitchen layout and modern conveniences – but without sacrificing the farmhouse charm. To create a more open feel, Anthony and John created a new sight line between the kitchen and dining room, removing the hanging cabinets that formerly separated the two spaces.

Kitchen, Before

Besides a dated appearance and less than optimal layout, the kitchen was badly in need of an appliance upgrade. It had an aging range/oven combo and no dishwasher.

Kitchen, After

A star in the new kitchen is the vintage-look Smeg refrigerator in mint green, color coordinated to match the new pendant lights and sconce. The old lower cabinets are replaced with a new kitchen peninsula with drawer storage and integrated range. New painted-wood floor tiles in gray and white, along with the new pendants, create a visual delineation between the kitchen and dining room. Additionally, an original chimney was uncovered to add an exposed brick element to the space.

Kitchen, Before

The homeowners weren't keen on the outdated cabinets – or the scalloped trim withs sharp points along the bottom edges, a potential safety hazard. Even worse, demolition would later reveal that the upper cabinets and kitchen ceiling were being supported by the repurposed table leg that was serving as a makeshift support column – also definitely a hazard and not up to code specs.

Kitchen, After

With the old "support post" and cabinets removed, a new LVL support header was added between the dining room and kitchen to more safely support the upper floor, transferring the weight via vertical supports to a new footing installed in the basement. The support was then skinned in wood reclaimed from an old hand-hewn beam to give it a rough, rustic look and maintain the antiquated farmhouse feel. Continuing the rough-hewn aesthtetic, the base of the new peninsula is also wrapped in reclaimed wood.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Jersey Farmhouse Kitchen

In the new configuration, the location of the refrigerator and range were flipped, helping to create a more efficient kitchen layout while opening up additional counter space.

Kitchen, Detail

The sink was kept in its original location, taking advantage of the natural light from the window, but the old one was replaced with a traditional apron-front design in keeping with the farmhouse look. The backsplash is a pitted, elongated subway tile that works well in either a traditional or contemporary setting.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Jersey Farmhouse Kitchen

Embracing old-time themes full on, John and Anthony used wood reclaimed from an old barn in Ohio — with authentic decorative cut-outs — to create a pantry door.

Kitchen, Detail

Engineered wood floor-tiles in a classic and elegant pattern and soft gray tones combine well with the natural wood textures. These are 12" wood tiles with the pattern printed on the surface and are an easy install.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Kitchen, Detail

This old antique wooden door from an out house is used to function as the door to the kitchen pantry. It was a creative way to keep the old rustic farm house feel.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Kitchen, Detail

"The important thing for us here is that this is a very historic home," says Anthony, "It's very clear that [the homeowners] bought this home wanting to respect history, and we wanted to work within that."

 

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Kitchen, Detail

Black engineered quartz countertops, with natural veining pattern, bring a striking contrast alongside the new white cabinets and open shelving.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Kitchen, Detail

Brightly colored glass bottles, a rustic wooden crate and antique copper kettle add color, texture and contrast as decorative accents in the new open shelving.

Dining Room, Detail

A lighted marquis letter "B" celebrates the Bennett's newly updated home and provides a high-profile accent atop the vintage console in the newly remodeled dining room.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Dining Room, Detail

This old antique kitchen cabinet serves as a bar, and storage area for plates and dishes. It is also a great place to store old antique decorations that will make it an eye catching corner piece as well.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Dining Room, Detail

The large lit up letter B, not only stands for the family's last name, Bennett, but also functions as a light to brighten a dark corner, and as an exciting design element.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Dining Room, Detail

Worn antique chairs were given new life with a fresh coat of black paint, providing contrast with the wood floors and rustic farm table.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Dining Room, Detail

A red antique lantern and vintage suitcase add color and visual interest atop a rustic wood bench in a corner of the dining room.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Job's Done. Time for Cocktails

Moscow Mule, anyone? Copper mugs provide another stylized touch in the newly redecorated dining room.

If you enjoyed this America's Most Desperate Kitchens makeover, you might also enjoy the Retro Mod Kitchen, also from Season 2.

Photo By: Chris Amaral

Northern California Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

And in the new episode airing tonight, John and Anthony head back California to help a young couple turn a dingy, poorly lit, unfinished kitchen into a bright and open space with sleek lines, modern design elements, a custom two-tiered kitchen island and custom glass-enclosed wine rack. Check out the complete makeover, below.

Island Seating for Six in Renovated State of the Art Kitchen

Island Seating for Six in Renovated State of the Art Kitchen

As seen on America's Most Desperate Kitchens, this renovated kitchen space in Carmichael, California has been transformed into a state of the art space. The new design features an eat in kitchen with island seating for six, comfortable, leather chairs, updated, stainless steel appliances and a custom, easily accessible wine rack.

From: America's Most Desperate Kitchens

Photo by: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Martin Klimek/Getty Images

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Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

Kitchen Cousins John Colaneri and Anthony Carrino turned a dingy, poorly lit, unfinished kitchen into this bright and open space with sleek lines, modern design elements and a custom temperature-controlled wine enclosure. The redesigned kitchen efficiently integrates prep, serving and dining spaces in one area and flows seamlessly into the adjacent living room.

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

Homeowners Trevor and Kelly wanted a space that was not only a functional cook's kitchen (Kelly's an avid baker), but also one that's conducive to hosting guests. To achieve that, Anthony and John expanded the kitchen and installed this large kitchen island with genereous prep surface and extension on a slightly lower, more dining-friendly height. For evening entertaining, the newly renovated space is warmly and elegantly lit with a whole new lighting scheme.

The Living Room, AFTER

The adjacent living room mirrors the kitchen's design aesthetic with a contemporary update drawing on the home's midcentury roots.

The Living Room, AFTER

Clean lines and simple geometry create a visually interesting space that's, at once, comfortable, casual and inviting. The color palette for both the living room and kitchen relies heavily on light neutrals, whites and grays helping to create a visually integrated space.

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

In lieu of a formal dining room, the spacious kitchen island includes counter seating. The drop-down countertop extension keeps the dining surface separate from the prep and work space.

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

The main surface of the island is white quartz in a waterfall edge design. The dining surface is in dark gray and is matched with black leather chairs in a contemporary design.

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

A large L-shaped counter configuration, also in white quartz, provides additional prep space and plenty of room for kitchen accessories and accents.

A Desperate Kitchen, BEFORE

Kelly and Trevor Runnel's midcentury era home had originally belonged to Trevor's grandparents. Prior to the renovation the kitchen had no dishwasher and still had its original '50s vintage stove – with only two burners now working. Trevor and Kelly wanted a kitchen that was more open and functional, but also wanted any improvements to be in line with the nostalgic feelings they had for the house as a whole.

AFTER

The renovation brightened up and improved the space considerably but stayed true to the period of the home. It included a modified and enlarged kitchen floor plan as well as updated appliances and all new lighting, cabinetry and countertops.

BEFORE

Trevor and Kelly had attempted to remove a pony wall that separated the original kitchen from the living room. After realizing that a kitchen remodel was more than they wanted to tackle themselves, they had abandoned the project midway, leaving just the bare wall studs and wiring.

AFTER

Anthony and John removed what was left of the pony wall, opening up the space, removing the barrier that had interfered with the room's overall flow and highlighting the vaulted ceiling.

BEFORE

The original kitchen was visually awkward, had a small footprint and was only marginally functional. Anthony and John's design plan called for: (1) relocating one of the exterior doors (the one seen here at right) to facilitate a better layout, (2) integrating a serving/eating area for a more open feel and improved functionality, and (3) adding a dramatic aspirational feature to help elevate the home's overall value and appeal.

AFTER

Moving the secondary access door further to the right helped open up the space for better placement of appliances and made room for additional counter space. The kitchen's signature feature is the custom wine wall that holds 400 bottles of wine and craft beer in a glass-enclosed, lighted and temperature-controlled space.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

BEFORE

Prior to the renovation one of the more noticeable problems in the kitchen was inadequate and unattractive lighting. Aside from a small light over the sink, there was only a single light fixture for the whole space.

AFTER

The new kitchen is lighted by an impressive chandelier with a modern design and multiple globe fixtures. Throughout the kitchen there are fourteen new fixtures and multiple light sources including track lights, recessed lighting, lighted range hood and a modern styled pendant over the sink. The location of the range and sink have been flipped and the window over the sink has been notably enlarged to bring more natural light into the space.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

The kitchen's signature feature is a custome wine wall that holds 400 bottles of wine and craft beer in a glass-enclosed, lighted and temperature-controlled room.

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

The new refrigerator, located at the end of the new run of white cabinets, is concealed behind an integrated panel of dark-stained wood. Likewise the new dishwasher is concealed from view behind a white panel in the lower cabinets. For a decorative accent, Anthony and John attached two-inch maple slats, stained in transluscent gray, over the black face of the island.

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

The island surface has two distinct planes — the main prep area in white quartz and the lower dining surface in dark gray with a concrete look. The lower surface is mounted using quarter-inch steel brackets for a float-mount effect. For the lighted wine enclosure, the 3/8" tempered glass surround is installed in a manner similar to a glass shower. The glass panels are secured to both the floor and wall using prefabricated metal rails.

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

The kitchen is brightened dramatically by the white cabinetry and quartz countertops. The kitchen and living room are unified by wood-look vinyl flooring in natural limed gray finish. The spaces are visually tied together also by the gray tones in the island's dining surface, the tile backsplash, the reclaimed wood backing above the mantel and gray furnishings for the living room.

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

The kitchen backsplash is of handmade 4" hex tiles in steely blue-gray with a crackle pattern. With the location of the sink and range reversed, the sink is now below the large picture window that replaced the tiny window that was there previously. The new 7-foot by 3-foot window provides an improved view of the outside, more natural light in the kitchen and, since there was an existing picture window on the living room side, provides a more balanced appearance to the home's exterior.

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

The refrigerator is concealed by custom wood panels and wood cabinets in matching finish.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

The enclosed wine rack is backed by a gray oak panel and surround in black-lacquer finish. The bottles are held in floating horizontal position by brushed metal pegs.

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

By adding the island extension dropped to table height, the need for a separate dining table is essentially eliminated.

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Kitchen, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Modern, Open Living Room

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, BEFORE

Prior to the renovation, the living room was unspectacular, but John was encouraged to see that the original mid-century vintage fireplace, with elongate bricks for the hearth and surround, was intact.

Living Room, AFTER

John and Anthony kept the original fireplace and simply updated it with fresh paint. Its authentic mid-century style meshes well with the new chandelier and other modern touches.

Living Room, Detail

The fireplace was freshened up with bright white paint and a new wood panel installed above the mantel. The wood backing is reclaimed wood that was custom planed to the proper thickness using a custom planer. Only the back side of the planks were planed, deliberately leaving the aged silver-gray patina of the surface side intact.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

New window treatments, neutral gray wall paint and white trim alter the room's ambiance, giving it a fresher, lighter feel.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, After

The existing wood beams are given a darker finish, providing a dramatic contrast with the room's lighter palette.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

Nested metal-frame coffee tables pair nicely with the contemporary sectional sofa in dark gray.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, Detail

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Living Room, AFTER

 

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

Modern Wine-Lovers' Kitchen

"Our kitchen was a dark, scary hole that you couldn't cook in; now it's open and bright" --homeowner Kelly Runnel

If you enjoyed this America's Most Desperate Kitchens makeover, you might also like: Retro-Modern Kitchen & Bar, also from Season 2.

Photo By: Martin Klimek/Getty Images

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