Design 101

The Elements of Feng Shui

Learn how a balance of wood, fire, earth, metal and water can bring balance to your space and your life.

Font
  • A
  • A
  • A

E-mail This Page to Your Friends

x

All fields are required.

Separate multiple e-mail addresses with a comma; Maximum 20 email addresses.

Refresh

Sending E-mail

Sending E-mail

Or Do Not E-mail

Success!

A link to %this page% was e-mailed

garden water feature makes dramatic statement

5. Water. Water's domain encompasses spirituality and the emotions. A balance of water brings about inspiration, wisdom and insightfulness. Too much water can create the feeling of unbalanced transition and the sense that you're drowning emotionally. It can make you feel overwhelmed and overly social. When there's too little water, you may experience a lack of sympathy, loneliness, isolation, stress and pettiness.

When incorporating the water element, add:

  • the color black or any deep, dark tones
  • reflective surfaces, such as mirrors and gazing balls
  • wavy, free-form or asymmetrical shapes
  • water or water features, such as aquariums and fountains

Pulling It Together

Now that you understand the basic characteristics of each element, keep in mind one more thing: The objects in your home very often have several elements reflected within each of them. For example, a red flowerpot full of white tulips would represent four of the five elements. The red pot represents fire, the clay pot itself is earth, the flowers represent wood and the white of the tulips are metal.

Begin playing with the arrangement of elements by starting small, with an entry table or a dresser in your bedroom. Add your red flowerpot of tulips and a few other items, such as a mirror for water and an arrangement of polished stones for metal. 

To tackle an entire room, start by noticing and labeling all the objects within a space. If you find yourself using a specific room less than others or avoiding it altogether, the elemental balance may need some adjusting. Be on the lookout for rooms made up of only one or two elements. By adding in objects that represent those missing elements, you'll be well on your way to creating a balanced and inviting room.

12345Next »

More From Design 101

The 3 Principles of Interior Design

The 3 Principles of Interior Design

HGTV gives tips on how to incorporate function, mood and personality in any decorating project.

Furniture Glossary: Tables

Furniture Glossary: Tables

Whether in the bedroom, living room or its favorite place: the dining room, tables are one of the most versatile pieces of...

(5 photos)
Furniture Glossary: Case Goods

Furniture Glossary: Case Goods

Discover case goods at HGTV.com, wood furniture pieces that provide interior storage space. Most often, case goods are pieces...

(23 photos)

From our Sister Sites:

Advertisement

HGTV Inspiration Newsletter

Create your unique, personal style with advice and inspiration from HGTV.